Daniel Nicoletti

Brazil, São Paulo http://dantti.wordpress.com 29 Posts

Cutelyst 1.10.0 released!

Cutelyst the Qt Web Framework got a new release, another round of bug fixes and this time increased unit testing coverage.

RoleACL plugin is a very useful one, it was written due the need for controlling what users could access, sadly the system I wrote that needed this got unused (although I got my money for this) so this plugin didn't get much attention, partially because it was basically complete.

Then last release I added documentation to it due a user's request and shortly after I found out that it wasn't working at all, even worse it wasn't forbidding users like it should do. So after the fix I moved on writing unit test for many other stuff. There's still missing stuff but overall coverage is much larger now.

Enjoy https://github.com/cutelyst/cutelyst/archive/v1.10.0.tar.gz

Cutelyst 1.9.0 released!

Cutelyst the Qt web framework got a new release. This is a rather small release but has some important fixes so I decided to roll sooner.

The dispatcher logic got 30% faster, parsing URL encoded data is also a bit faster on some cases (using less memory), Context objects can now be instantiated by library users to allow for example getting notifications from SQL databases and be able to forward to Cutelyst actions or Views, pkg-config support has also improved a bit but still misses most modules.

Have fun https://github.com/cutelyst/cutelyst/archive/v1.9.0.tar.gz

Announcing Sticklyst - leveraging KDE Frameworks on the Web

Sticklyst is a web paste tool, like pastebin, Stick Notes (paste.kde.org), build with Cutelyst and KDE Frameworks.

Building this kind of tool has been on my TODO list for a long time, but never really put some effort into it. When the idea first came by, I decided to look at the code of http://paste.scsys.co.uk/ which is powered by a Perl Catalyst application, to my surprise the Perl module that handled syntax highlighting was a port of the code of Kate, and it even said it used Kate's definitions.

If that code used Kate's, I'd better use the code directly, I hoped it wouldn't be too coupled with GUI classes, but failed to find the code. A week ago I saw a mention about this on KDE's mailing list, so with a little help from some IRC fellows I met the https://cgit.kde.org/syntax-highlighting.git/ code.

Then thanks to some tips from Volker Krause who showed me how to use it without GUI widgets, I managed to build a simple web app, which I presented live on the first Qt conference here in Brazil at São Paulo https://br.qtcon.org/.

Just for record the application uses less than 3MB of RAM and renders quickly using a sqlite db for the storage.

The code is 90% completed, is on production at https://paste.cutelyst.org/, and is now up for adoption. Basically someone willing to take care of it could implement the following missing features compared to Stick Notes:

  • Extra database support
  • URL shortener
  • User authentication

The list is short and the code is clean, go test, break, hack:

https://github.com/cutelyst/sticklyst

Have fun!

Cutelyst 1.8.0 released

Cutelyst the Qt Web Framework, has another stable release, this release is mostly filled with bug fixes, the commit log is rather small.

It got fixes on Cutelyst-WSGI to properly work on Windows, QtCreator integration fixes, properly installing dll's on Windows, fix returning the right status from views (this allows you to know if for example View::Email sent the email with success).

Cutelyst is cross-platform, the code builds on CI running on Windows, OSX and Linux, but first class is still UNIX systems, as I don't use Windows, nor have a VM with development configured so I have only ensured it build fine on AppVeyor, Aurel Branzeanu provided some pull requests to improve that, if you also happen to have experience with CMake, MSVC and Windows please help me review or do other pull requests.

The release also got two API additions:

  • Context::setStash(QString, ParamsMultiMap), ParamsMultiMap also known as QMap<QString, QString> is a type used on HTTP query and body parameters, having this method avoid writing ugly code full of QVariant::fromValue()
  • Application::pathTo(QString), instead of using the QStringList version which join the strings to build a path (like the Catalyst does), this just gets the string as you would pass to a QFile, that in turn deals with platform issues.

I'm a bit busy with html-qt and also planning a rewrite of simplemail-qt to be async, so expect smaller Cutelyst releases :)

Again help is welcome (specially on Windows usage).

Get it here https://github.com/cutelyst/cutelyst/archive/v1.8.0.tar.gz

CMlyst 0.3.0 released

CMlyst is a Web Content Management System built using Cutelyst, it was initially inspired by Wordpress and then Ghost. So it's a mixture of both.

Two years ago I did it's first release, and since them I've been slowly improving it, it's been on production for that long providing www.cutelyst.org web site/blog. The 0.2.0 release was a silent one which marks the transition from QSettings storage to sqlite.

Storing content on QSettings is at first quite interesting since it's easy to use but it showed not suitable very fast, first it kept leaving .lock files, then it's not very fast to access so I had used a cache with all data, and a notifier updated that when something changed on the directory, but this also didn't properly triggered QFileSystemWatcher so once a new page was out the cache wasn't properly updated.

Once it was ported to sqlite, I decided to study how Ghost worked, this was mainly due many Qt/KDE developer switching to it. Ghost is quite simplistic, so it was very easy to try to provide something quite compatible with it, porting a Ghost theme to CMlyst requires very little changes due it's syntax being close to Grantlee/Django.

Due porting to sqlite it also became clear that an export/import tool was needed, so you can now import/export it in JSON format, pretty close to Ghost, actually you can even import all you Ghost pages with it, but the opposite won't work, and that's because we store pages as HTML not Markdown, my feeling about markdown is that it is simple to use, convenient to geeks but it's yet another thing to teach users which can simply use a WYSIWYG editor.

Security wise you need to be sure that both Markdown and HTML are safe, and CMlyst doesn't do this, so if you put it on production be sure that only users that know what they are doing use it, you can even break the layout with a not closed tag.

But don't worry, I'm working on a fix for this, html-qt is a WHATWG HTML5 specification parser, mostly complete, but the part to have a DOM, is not done yet, with it, I can make sure the HTML won't break layout and remove unsafe tags.

Feature wise, CMlyst has 80% of Ghost features, if you like it please help add missing features to Admin page.

Some cool numbers

Comparing CMlyst to Ghost can be trick, but it's interesting to see the numbers.

Memory usage:

  • CMlyst uses ~5MB
  • Ghost uses ~120MB

Requests per second (using the same page content)

  • CMlyst 3500/rps (production mode), 1108/rps (developer mode)
  • Ghost 100/rps (production mode)

While the RPS number is very different, on production you can use NGINX cache which would make the slow Ghost RPS not a problem, but that comes to a price of more storage and RAM usage, if you run on an AWS micro instance with 1GB of RAM this means you can have a lot less instances running at the same time, some simple math shows you could have 200 CMlyst instaces vs 8 of Ghost.

Try it!

https://github.com/cutelyst/CMlyst/archive/v0.3.0.tar.gz

Sadly it's also liked soon I'll be forking Grantlee, the lack of maintenance just hit me yesterday (when I was going to release this), Qt 5.7+ has changed QDateTime::toString() to include TZ data which broke Grantlee date filter which isn't expecting that, so I had to do a weird workaround marking date as local to avoid the extra information.