Daniel Nicoletti

Brazil, São Paulo http://dantti.wordpress.com 28 Posts

Cutelyst 1.2.0 released

Cutelyst the C++/Qt web framework has a new release.

  • Test coverage got some additions to avoid breaks in future.
  • Responses without content-length (chunked or close) are now handled properly.
  • StatusMessage plugin got new methods easier to use and has the first deprecated API too.
  • Engine class now has a struct with the request subclass should create, benchmarks showed this as a micro optimization but I've heard function with many arguments (as it was before) are bad on ARM so I guess this is the first optimization for ARM :)
  • Chained dispatcher finally got a performance improvement, I didn't benchmark it but it should be much faster now.
  • Increased the usage of lambdas when the called function was small/simple, for some reason they reduce the library size so I guess it's a good thing...
  • Sql helper classes can now use QThread::objectName() which has the worker thread id as it's name so writing thread safe code is easier.
  • WSGI got static-map and static-map2 options both work the same way as in uWSGI allowing you to serve static files without the need of uWSGI or a webserver.
  • WSGI got both auto-reload and touch-reload implemented, which help a lot on the development process.
  • Request::addressString() was added to make it easier to get the string representation of the client IP also removing the IPv6 prefix if IPv4 conversion succeeds.
  • Grantlee::View now exposes the Grantlee::Engine pointer so one can add filters to it (usefull for i18n)
  • Context got a locale() method to help dealing with translations
  • Cutelyst::Core got ~25k smaller
  • Some other small bug fixes and optimizations....

For 1.3.0 I hope WSGI module can deal with FastCGI and/or uwsgi protocols, as well as helper methods to deal with i18n. But a CMlyst release might come first :)

Enjoy https://github.com/cutelyst/cutelyst/archive/r1.2.0.tar.gz

Cutelyst 1.1.2 released

Cutelyst the C++/Qt Web Framework just got a new release.

Yesterday I was going to do the 1.1.0 release, after running tests, and being happy with current state I wrote this blog post, but before I publish I went to www.cutelyst.org CMS (CMlyst) to paste the same post, and I got hit by a bug I had on 1.0.0, which at time I thought it was a bug in CMlyst, so decided to investigate and found a few other bugs with our WSGI not properly changing the current directory and not replacing the + sign with an ' ' space when parsing formdata, which was the main bug. So did the fixes tagged as 1.1.1 and today found that automatically setting Content-Length wasn't working when the View rendered nothing.

Cutelyst Core and Plugins API/ABI are stable but Cutelyst-WSGI had to have changes, I forgot to expose the needed API for it to actually be useful outside Cutelyst so this isn't a problem (nobody would be able to use it anyway). So API stability got extended to all components now.

Thanks to a KDAB video about perf I finally managed to use it and was able to detect two slow code paths in Cutelyst-WSGI.

The first and that was causing 7% overhead was due QTcpSocket emitting readyRead() signal and in the HttpParser code I was calling sender() to get the socket, turns out the sender() method implementation is not as simple as I thought it was and there is a QMutexLocker which maybe caused some thread to wait on it (not sure really), so now for each QTcpSocket there is an HttpParser class, this uses a little more memory but the code got faster. Hopefully in Qt6 the signal can have a readyRead(QIODevice *) signature.

The second was that I end up using QByteArrayMatcher to match \r\n to get request headers, perl was showing it was causing 1.2% overhead, doing some benchmarks I replaced it by a code that was faster. Using a single thread on my Intel I5 I can process 85k req/s, so things got indeed a little faster.

It got a contribution from a new developer on View::Email, which made me do a new simplemail-qt release (1.3.0), the code there still needs love regarding performance but I didn't manage to find time to improve it yet.

This new release has some new features:

  • EPoll event loop was added to Linux builds, this is supposedly to be faster than default GLib but I couldn't measure the difference properly, this is optional and requires CUTELYST_EVENT_LOOP_EPOLL=1 environment to be set.
  • ViewEmail got methods to set/get authentication method and connection type
  • WSGI: can now set TCP_NODELAY, TCP KEEPALIVE, SO_SNDBUF and SO_RCVBUF on command line, these use the same name as in uwsgi
  • Documentation was improved a bit and can be generated now with make docs, which doesn't require me to changing Cutelyst version manually anymore

And also some important bug fixes:

  • Lazy evaluation of Request methods was broken on 1.0.0
  • WSGI: Fixed loading configs and parsing command line option

Download https://github.com/cutelyst/cutelyst/archive/r1.1.2.tar.gz and have fun!

Cutelyst benchmarks on TechEmpower round 13

Right on my first blog post about Cutelyst users asked me about more "realistic" benchmarks and mentioned TechEmpower benchmarks. Though it was a sort of easy task to build the tests at that time it didn't seem to be useful to waste time as Cutelyst was moving target.

Around 0.12 it became clear that the API was nearly freezing and everyone loves benchmarks so it would serve as a "marketing" thing. Since the beginning of the project I've learned lots of optimizations which made the code get faster and faster, there is still room from improvement, but changes now need to be carefully measured.

Cutelyst is the second Web Framework on TechEmpower benchmarks that uses Qt, the other one being treefrog, but Qt's appearance was noticed on their blog:

https://www.techempower.com/blog/2016/11/16/framework-benchmarks-round-13/

The cutelyst-thread tests suffered from a segfault (that was restarted by master process), the fix is in 1.0.0 release but it was too late for round 13, so round 14 it will get even better results.

https://www.techempower.com/benchmarks/

If you want to help MongoDB/Grantlee/Clearsilver tests are still missing :D

Cutelyst 1.0.0 with stable API/ABI is out!

Cutelyst the Qt web framework just reached it's first stable release, it's been 3 years since the first commit and I can say it finally got to a shape where I think I'm able to keep it's API/ABI stable. The idea is to have any break into a 2.0 release by the end of next year although I don't expect many changes as the I'm quite happy with it's current state.

The biggest change from the last release is the SessionStoreFile class, it initially used QSettings for it's simplicity but it was obvious that it's performance would be far from ideal, so I replaced QSettings with a plain QFile and QDataStream, this produced smaller session files and made the code twice as fast, but profiling was showing it was still slow because it was writing to disk multiple times on the same request. So the code was changed to merge the changes and only save to disk when the Context get's destroyed, on my machine the performance went from 3,5k to 8.5k on read and writes and 4k to 12k on reads, this is on the same session id, should probably be faster with different ids. This is also very limited by the disk IO as we use a QLockFile to avoid concurrency, so if you need something faster you can subclass SessionStore and use Sql or Redis...

Besides that the TechEmpower 13th preview rounds showed a segfault in the new Cutelyst WSGI in threaded mode, a very hard to reproduce but with an easy fix. The initial fix made the code a bit ugly so I searched to see if XCode clang got an update on thread_local feature and finally, XCode 8 has support for it, if you are using XCode clang now you need version 8.

Many other small bugs also got in and API from 0.13.0 is probably unchanged.

Now if you are a distro packager please :D package it, or if you are a dev and was afraid of API breaks keep calm and have fun!

Download: https://github.com/cutelyst/cutelyst/archive/r1.0.0.tar.gz

Cutelyst 0.13.0 released!

cutelyst-logoCutelyst the Qt web framework just got a new release, 0.13.0.

A new release was needed now that we have this nice new logo. 

Special thanks to Alessandro Longo (Alex L.) for crafting this cute logo, and a cool favicon for Cutelyst web site.

But this release ain't only about the logo, it's full of cool things: 

When I started Cutelyst a simple developer Engine (read HTTP engine) was created, it was very slow and mostly an ugly hackery but helped work on the APIs that matter, I then took a look at uWSGI due some friend saying it was awesome and it was great to be able to deal with many protocols without the hassled of writing parsers for them.

Fast forwarding to 0.12.0 release and I started to feel that I was reaching a limit on Cutelyst optimizations and uWSGI was holding us back, and it wasn't only about performance,  memory usage (scalability) was too high for something that should be rather small, it's written in C after all. 

It also has a fixed number of requests it can take, if you start it with 5 threads or process it's 5 blocking clients that can be processed at the same time, if you use the async option you then have a fixed number of clients per process, 5 process * 5 async clients = 25 clients at the same time, but this 5 async clients are always pre-allocated which means that each new process will also be bigger right from launch.

Think now about websockets, how can one deal with 5000 simultaneous clients? 50 process with async = 100? Performance on async mode was also slower due complexity to deal with them.

So before getting into writing an alternative to uWSGI in Cutelyst I did a simple experiment, asked uWSGI to load a Cutelyst app and fork 1000 times and wrote a simple QCoreApplication that would do the same, uWSGI used > 1GB of RAM and took around 10s to start, while the Qt app used < 300MB of RAM and around 3s. So ~700MB of RAM is a lot of RAM and that was enough to get me started.

Cutelyst-wsgi, is born, and granted the command line arguments are very similar to uWSGI and I also followed the same separation between socket and protocol handling, of course in C++ things are more reusable, so our Protocol class has a HTTP subclass and in future will have FastCGI and uWSGI ones too.

Did I say uWSGI before 2.1 doesn't support keep-alive? And that 2.1 is not released nor someone knows when it will? Cutelyst-wsig supports keep-alive, http pipelining, is complete async and yes, performs a little better. If you put NGINX in front of uWSGI you can get keep alive support, but guess what? the uwsgi protocol closes the connection between the front server so it's quite hard to get very high speeds. Preliminary results of TechEmpower Benchmarks #13 showed Cutelyst hitting these limits as others frameworks were using keep-alive properly.

Thanks to this new Engine the Engine API got several improvements and is quite stable now. Besides it a few other important changes were made as well:

  • Change internals to take advantage of NRVO (named return value optimization)
  • Improved speed of Context::uriFor() making Cutelyst now require Qt 5.6 due a behavior change in QUrl
  • Improved speed and memory usage of Url query parser 1s faster in 1m iterations, using QByteArray::split() is very convenient but it allocates more memory and a QList for the results, using ::indexOf() and manually getting the parts is both faster and more memory efficient but yes, this is the optimization we do in Cutelyst::Core and that makes a difference, in application code the extra complexity might not worth it.
  • C++ for ranged loops, all our Q_FOREACH & friends where replaced with for ranged loops
  • Use of new reverse and equal_range iterators
  • Use QHash for storing headers, this was done after several benchmarks that showed QHash was faster for all common cases, namely if it keept the values() in order like QMap it would be used in other places as well
  • Replaced most QList with QVector, and internally std::vector
  • Multipart/form-data got faster, it doesn't seek() anymore but requires a not sequential QIODevice as each Upload object point to parts of the body device.
  • Add a few more unit tests.

Thanks to the above the core library size is also a bit smaller, ~640KB on x64.

I was planning to do a 1.0 after 0.13 but with this new engine I think it's better to have a 0.14 version, and make sure no more changes in Core will be needed for additional protocols. 

Download here enjoy!